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Measuring Candidate Ability (Part 1/3)

Measuring Candidate Ability (Part 1/3)

Measuring Candidate Ability (Part 1/3)

Part 1 our trilogy of blog posts exploring Measuring Candidate Ability, covers some basics about how our ability tests work, before taking a more in-depth look at the first level of our suite of ability assessments, called CWS (Essential).

 

What does an Ability Test measure?

Ability Tests measure candidates’ maximum performance of ability. The results from our ability tests show how a candidate has performed in comparison to a diverse group of previous test takers. 

This allows us to interpret the results in terms of what is typical within a given group, rather than just how many questions a candidate has. Each report contains details of the norm group candidates have been compared to. 

What Does an Ability Test measure?

How does an Ability Test work?

All Ability Tests on the Psycruit platform work through the randomisation of what we call forms.

Forms are essentially made up of clusters of different questions, known as an item bank.

The selection of forms is randomised, such that different candidates are presented with a different set of forms. The ordering of the questions within the forms is then also randomised. This ensures that different candidates are presented with different selections of questions at random, which helps to ensure the security of our assessments, and prevent behaviours like cheating and collusion. 

This also allows us to match different sets of questions for difficulty to ensure that all candidates receive assessments which are of the same level of difficulty overall, even if individual clusters or items vary. 

Types of Ability Tests on Psycruit

Ability Tests on our assessment platform Psycruit come in 3 different levels; CWS (essential), B2C (enhanced) and Utopia (expert). 

CWS (Essential):
Basic comprehension assessment. Designed for blue-collar, manual and industrial roles. 

B2C (Enhanced):
Our most widely used assessment. Designed for entry and mid-level roles, such as customer service or administration. 

Utopia (Expert): 
The highest level of assessment we offer. Designed for graduates, professionals and specialists.

Ability tests - Measuring candidate Ability

CWS (Essential) Ability Tests

Areas of Use

The CWS (Essential) ability tests were designed primarily for manufacturing environments and public utilities. The instruments are suited to organisations which have a strong production or engineering focus.

Within this industrial sector, the instruments are relevant to a range of occupational groups: 

  • Hourly paid operatives 
  • Semi-skilled employees
  • Apprentices 
  • Team leaders 
  • First level supervisors

Many of the candidates who take the CWS tests are people who left school after achieving some qualifications at GCSE level.

This series of ability tests have been designed to be appropriate across a broad range of difficulty levels. This means that they are suitable for the assessment of a range of individuals; from those who have no educational qualifications to those who have achieved A-levels or post-school Diplomas/Certificates. 

Candidates above this educational level (e.g. graduates) are likely to require tests which are different in nature, as well as difficulty, in order to reflect the responsibilities of the jobs for which they are being considered.

 

There are 3 different assessments in this series: 

 

CWS Verbal Reasoning (Essential)

Our CWS Essential Verbal Reasoning Test is aimed at roles where candidates have to comprehend, analyse and draw conclusions from written information: 


Candidates will have to:

  • Comprehend and make judgements about written extracts 
  • Prove their critical reasoning skills and not just simple comprehension 
  • Evaluate whether a statement is true or false based on the information provided 


Verbal Reasoning Test time limit:
10 minutes 

Number of questions: 16  

Number of questions in the item bank: 64 

Practice questions before starting the assessment: Yes 

Also available in: Swedish, Norwegian 

Verbal reasoning test - Measuring candidate Ability

Numerical Reasoning (Essential)

The CWS Numerical Reasoning Test is aimed at roles where candidates need to be comfortable with numbers, mathematical functions and interpreting numerical data:

Candidates will have to:

  • Understand and analyse numerical data 
  • Demonstrate their numerical comprehension, reasoning and arithmetic 

 

Test time limit: 15 minutes 

Number of questions: 16  

Number of questions in the item bank: 32 

Practice questions before starting the assessment: No 

Also available in: Swedish, Norwegian 

Numerical reasoning test - Measuring candidate Ability

Mechanical Reasoning (Essential)

Our Mechanical Reasoning Test is aimed at roles where candidates need to work with and understand mechanical or technical concepts. 

Candidates will have to:

  • Show they understand and can apply basic principles of physics to mechanical devices 
  • Show they understand a variety of mechanical processes such as gears, pulleys, levels and hydraulics 

 

Test time limit: 12 minutes 

Number of questions: 20  

Number of questions in the item bank: 40 

Practice questions before starting the assessment: No 

Also available in: Swedish, Finnish, Norwegian 

Mechanical reasoning test - Measuring candidate Ability

 

Stay tuned for part 2 in our series about Measuring Candidate Ability, which looks at our mid-level series of ability assessments, B2C Enhanced.

 

 

Published by Ryan Inglethorpe

March 3rd, 2020 | Assessments, Ability Test

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